"Picasso's Villa," panel I, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel II, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel III, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel IV, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel V, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel VII, 66 x 66 in (168 X 168 cm) 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel Vll, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel VIII, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," panel I, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," panel I, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)

In the center is a mirrored door. To the right is a painting called "The Shadow." In that painting, Francoise Gilot is asleep on a sofa the day before she left Picasso. He entered the room, and his shadow fell over her body. On the left easel is a painting of his new wife sitting in the rocking chair looking at an empty canvas on the easel. 

"Picasso's Villa," Panel II, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel II, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)

This is another side of the painting studio. On the mantlepiece, there are two bottles of absinthe and a sculpture of a boy's head that was in Picasso's Bateau Lavoir studio fifty years earlier. On the sculpture stand to the right, there are toys made for his children. The chair in the center is now on display at the Picasso Museum in Paris. On the chair is a newspaper which Picasso used as his palette. The newspaper absorbed the oil from his colors allowing them to dry far more rapidly. This was how Picasso was able to produce so many paintings.

"Picasso's Villa," Panel III, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel III, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)

One day in April, 1956 Brigitte Bardot visited Picasso and posed for photos with him all over the studio. In the background I saw parts of the studio that do not appear in any other photos. So my pain ting reflects that exact day.

"Picasso's Villa," Panel IV, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel IV, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)

On the easel to the left is a print of "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon." The work surrounding it seems to be influenced by that painting. Jacqueline, dressed as one of Delacroix's "Women of Algiers," appears in two paintings and in three ceramic plates on the floor. The other ceramics are of goats, owls, bulls and satyrs, creatures that Picasso identified with.

"Picasso's Villa," Panel V, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel V, 66 x 74 in (168 X 188 cm)

There is a book of poems by Rimbaud on the table by the window. In the corner of the room is sculpture made out of pipes.On the sofa there is a bullfight painting made as a gift for Picasso by his son Claude and above that a secret portrait of Francoise Gilot.

"Picasso's Villa," Panel VII, 66 x 66 in (168 X 168 cm) 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel VII, 66 x 66 in (168 X 168 cm) 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)

On the chair to the left is a painting by Picasso of his studio. On the chair in the center is a painting of his wife in the studio looking at a painting of the studio on an easel.

"Picasso's Villa," Panel Vll, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel Vll, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)

On the shelf in the center of the wall, there is a bust of Dora Maar, an African sculpture, a bird cage and a gold clock that was a gift from Picasso's art dealer, Daniel Henry Kahnweiler.

"Picasso's Villa," Panel VIII, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)
       
     
"Picasso's Villa," Panel VIII, 66 x 66 in (168 x 168 cm)

Tiles that Picasso and his daughter Paloma have painted are displayed on the table. On the right wall is another little painting by Paloma of her step-mother, a bullfight announcement, a boomerang and the famous "Bull's Head" sculpture made from a bicycle seat and handlebars. Throughout this painting there are French newspapers from April, 1956 that can actually be read.