House Beautiful Magazine-A painting of "Matisse's Studio," by Damian Elwes, in the home of Californian collectors
       
     
"Warhol's Factory," acrylic on canvas, 62 x 72 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
Giacometti's Studio, gouache on board, 18 x 18 in, 2015
       
     
"Magritte's Studio", mixed media on canvas, 58 x 66 in, 2014
       
     
"Salvador Dali's Studio," gouache on board, 17 x 23 in
       
     
"Picasso's Studio in Cannes," mixed media, 62 x72 in, 2005, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Matisse's Studio in Nice," mixed media on canvas, 60 x 60 in, 2006
       
     
"Frida Kahlo's Studio in Coyoacan," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2008
       
     
Picasso's Studio at Rue de la Boetie, mixed media on canvas, 48 x 54 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio at Rue Schoelcher in 1914," watercolor and charcoal, 14 x 18 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio at Boulevard Clichy," gouache on board, 17 x 23 in, 2010, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio at the Bateau Lavoir," mixed media on canvas, 52 x 84 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Matisse's Studio in Collioure," mixed media on canvas, 66 x 66 in, 2005, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Cezanne's Studio during the creation of the Large Bathers," gouache on board, 18 x 23 in, 2008, Damian Elwes
       
     
Gauguin's Studio in the Marquesas Islands, mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2005, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Gauguin's Studio," mixed media on canvas, 66 x 86 in, 2006
       
     
"Monet's first Studio at Giverny," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2004, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Gauguin's Studio in Tahiti in 1895," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2003, Damian Elwes
       
     
House Beautiful Magazine-A painting of "Matisse's Studio," by Damian Elwes, in the home of Californian collectors
       
     
House Beautiful Magazine-A painting of "Matisse's Studio," by Damian Elwes, in the home of Californian collectors
"Warhol's Factory," acrylic on canvas, 62 x 72 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Warhol's Factory," acrylic on canvas, 62 x 72 in, Damian Elwes

I was lucky enough to know Andy Warhol and I imagined how I could make a painting of his studio that reflected my love of his work.

Giacometti's Studio, gouache on board, 18 x 18 in, 2015
       
     
Giacometti's Studio, gouache on board, 18 x 18 in, 2015
"Magritte's Studio", mixed media on canvas, 58 x 66 in, 2014
       
     
"Magritte's Studio", mixed media on canvas, 58 x 66 in, 2014

Despite his success, the painting activities of René Magritte were confined to a small corner of his living room in Belgium. Meanwhile, his paintings were always reaching out beyond the bounds of reality. He often painted an imaginary ocean outside this urban window. In "Personal Values" (1952), he filled the next door room with out-sized versions of his possessions.

"Salvador Dali's Studio," gouache on board, 17 x 23 in
       
     
"Salvador Dali's Studio," gouache on board, 17 x 23 in

I spent a day in Dali's Cadaques studio making this painting. After finishing the two walls, I went up to the roof and completed the landscape that had been partially visible through the two windows. The idea was inspired by an artwork in which Dali floated Velasquez's "Las Meninas" studio in the clouds.

"Picasso's Studio in Cannes," mixed media, 62 x72 in, 2005, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio in Cannes," mixed media, 62 x72 in, 2005, Damian Elwes

This was the first painting that I made of Picasso's Studio in Cannes. While making this painting, I discovered that Picasso was using almost all the rooms on the ground floor of his art deco villa as studios. I then decided to join eight paintings together so that one could walk around the ground floor and see the hundreds of artworks that he was in the process of making in 1956.

"Matisse's Studio in Nice," mixed media on canvas, 60 x 60 in, 2006
       
     
"Matisse's Studio in Nice," mixed media on canvas, 60 x 60 in, 2006

Matisse liked to make paintings that contained a window into another world, and so I tried to echo that here. I drove along the coast visiting studios in the South of France.  As I approached Nice, the sea changed to such a distinct color of blue, and I wanted that to be the focal point of this painting.

"Frida Kahlo's Studio in Coyoacan," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2008
       
     
"Frida Kahlo's Studio in Coyoacan," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2008

It is fun to vista Frida Kahlo's Casa Azul in Mexico City. The whole house is very colorful, but sadly, this first studio of hers is now an empty shell. Even the window and door has been filled in. Nevertheless, I stood there with all the information that I had gathered over the years and began to imagine just how the room was when Frida was working there.

Picasso's Studio at Rue de la Boetie, mixed media on canvas, 48 x 54 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
Picasso's Studio at Rue de la Boetie, mixed media on canvas, 48 x 54 in, Damian Elwes

By 1918, Picasso had moved to a bourgeoise neighborhood near to the Champs Elyssée. In the only photographs from this period, he was wearing a suit and tie while painting. He had been in his neoclassical phase since marrying a Russian ballet dancer. However, he suddenly fell in love with a young girl called Marie Thérèse Walters, and his work began to evolve. He also produced his first sculptures, and there is one on the shelf, another on the mantlepiece and a third below the easel.

"Picasso's Studio at Rue Schoelcher in 1914," watercolor and charcoal, 14 x 18 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio at Rue Schoelcher in 1914," watercolor and charcoal, 14 x 18 in, Damian Elwes

All the studios start off as watercolor and charcoal drawings like this one. They then become gouaches and then sometimes they become large canvases. Sydney Picasso helped me to locate all of her father-in-law's studios in Paris. She said that none of the Picasso family had been to this one, but she knew that it was currently occupied by an architect. When he answered the door, I asked him how the studio had changed architecturally since Picasso's time? He invited me in and kindly let me make this painting.

"Picasso's Studio at Boulevard Clichy," gouache on board, 17 x 23 in, 2010, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio at Boulevard Clichy," gouache on board, 17 x 23 in, 2010, Damian Elwes

When Cubism became a success, Picasso moved down the hill from the Bateau Lavoir to a 19th century studio building. A century later, I stood in front of this place and tried to deduce which was Picasso's studio. I had a photo that he had taken of Sacre Coeur from his window. All of the top floor windows were curved like the one in the photo, but only the studio on the top right corner had a view of Sacre Coeur. So I went upstairs and knocked on the door, but there was no response. I started knocking on adjacent doors, but just then the owner arrived. She only let me in because she was curious to know if this was truly Picasso's apartment. I showed her all the evidence, and she let me make my painting.

"Picasso's Studio at the Bateau Lavoir," mixed media on canvas, 52 x 84 in, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Picasso's Studio at the Bateau Lavoir," mixed media on canvas, 52 x 84 in, Damian Elwes

In 2015, the Fleming Museum created an exhibition about 'Les Demoiselles d'Avignon,' and they asked me to come and talk about Picasso. MOMA does not loan out 'Les Demoiselles.' So the Fleming has taken my painting of 'Picasso's  Bateau Lavoir Studio' and projected it into the entire space of a room using computer technology. Visitors entering the exhibition find themselves in Picasso's studio at the moment when he had just finished his masterpiece. My painting contains all of the various influences that led to this breakthrough moment when Picasso became the preeminent painter in Paris. It was a thrilling experience, and I can imagine how museums in the future could use any of my studio paintings in a similar way. Visitors were able to pick up an iPad and point it towards any of the Demoiselles in order to see all of Picasso's sketches that led to the creation of that woman.

"Matisse's Studio in Collioure," mixed media on canvas, 66 x 66 in, 2005, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Matisse's Studio in Collioure," mixed media on canvas, 66 x 66 in, 2005, Damian Elwes

This little port on the south coast of France attracts tourism because it was here that Matisse and Derain spent their summers painting. After 1907, Matisse would rent a house in the Port which is visible through the window. However, in 1905, he took a photo through this window from a studio where he was inventing Fauvism. 100 years later, I asked the old men playing boules on the beach where they thought that old photo was taken. They agreed that the only building with the windows above the doors was right behind us. The little tree in my painting is now huge, and the table and chairs on the beach are situated where there is now a bustling restaurant. I had located his Fauvist studio. Amazingly, the current occupants were unaware that Matisse had been here. 

"Cezanne's Studio during the creation of the Large Bathers," gouache on board, 18 x 23 in, 2008, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Cezanne's Studio during the creation of the Large Bathers," gouache on board, 18 x 23 in, 2008, Damian Elwes

Cezanne's studio in Aix-en-Provence is now a museum. Tours go through it every 20 minutes, but they allowed me to sit at his little desk to make a sketch. The tour guide kept repeating how nothing had changed since Cezanne's death, but I suddenly realized that all the studio furniture was out of place. There is a photo of Cezanne sitting in front of this canvas of "The Large Bathers" (1895-1906) with the stove behind it, but what may have confused the museum staff is that the stove has been moved. I located the place where it used to be, and sure enough, there was a line of green and blue paint across the floor boards where the easel had been.

Gauguin's Studio in the Marquesas Islands, mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2005, Damian Elwes
       
     
Gauguin's Studio in the Marquesas Islands, mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2005, Damian Elwes

Tahiti was not the Garden of Eden that Gauguin had hoped for. He was desperately poor and painted some of his masterpieces on burlap sacks. He even had to take a job at the Post Office. At the end of his life, he moved to the Marquesas Islands where he found a more perfect environment for creating his incredible paintings.

"Gauguin's Studio," mixed media on canvas, 66 x 86 in, 2006
       
     
"Gauguin's Studio," mixed media on canvas, 66 x 86 in, 2006

I have painted each of the seven studios that Gauguin had in Tahiti and the Marquesas Islands. This is the most accurate one from that series. It is the only studio that Gauguin built for himself (1898-99), and luckily, there is one surviving photograph of the interior and one of the exterior. Those images are very grainy and difficult to read, but after drawing them over and over again, I began to make out the digging tools and other elements among the straw on the ground. 

"Monet's first Studio at Giverny," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2004, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Monet's first Studio at Giverny," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2004, Damian Elwes

Monet's first studio at Giverny was in his house, and it remains mostly intact. Unfortunately, the view of the garden outside was obscured by the construction of a larger outdoor studio where he created the "Water Lilies" series.

"Gauguin's Studio in Tahiti in 1895," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2003, Damian Elwes
       
     
"Gauguin's Studio in Tahiti in 1895," mixed media on canvas, 62 x 72 in, 2003, Damian Elwes

The further one goes back in time, the more challenging it is to create a particular studio. I looked through Sotheby's and Christie's catalogues for all of Gauguin's belongings that have ever been sold. The trunk is the one that he brought from Paris while the bed, the armchair, bottles, bowls and fruit appeared in paintings from that period. It was also imperative to read Gauguin's diaries and written descriptions by people who visited him. This painting is owned by Donald Sutherland who played Gauguin in the film "Wolf at the Door."